The Books of 2012

CaptureThe Books of 2012

Every year, and I suggest every reader do this, I keep track of every book I read and the page number. Mostly for my own edification, but I like to try and beat my page count every year. I don’t count books with pictures. (I’m fond of graphic novels) 2012 was a decent year, I read 33 books for a total of 11,428 pages.  I’m glad to say I’m on track to easily beat that this year.  Without further introduction here is the list that was 2012.

  1. 77 Shadow Street Dean Koontz

 

I am pleased to say that Dean Koontz, one of my favorite authors (top 3 all time) is one author I can say I’ve read everything. Including his out of print paperbacks when he wrote some science fiction stuff.  He once said he would never reprint those, I hope he changes his mind.  Anyway,  this book, was entertaining, though it reminded me of Dragon Tears which is an amazing book.

  1. A Separate Peace  John Knowles

Classic number one this year. This book is perfect if you’re a guy. You can relate to the central character very well, and though a lot of the “war tones” are lost on kids who read it now, it remains relatable in context of boyhood to manhood.

  1. Bethany’s Sin Robert McCammon

 

Entertaining short read, a horror novel of mediocre proportion and entertainment.

  1. Boy’s Life  Robert McCammon

The best book I read this past year. An amazing adventure set in the time everyone yearns for:  That time where you’re not quite a child and not quite an adult. This book is beautiful and poignant.

  1. Burglars Can’t be Choosers Lawrence Block

 

I don’t take many trips into the realm of mystery. However Block makes it entertaining with his snarky burglar and easy writing. These books you can polish off in a day, and you know it was a day not wasted.

  1. Cold Days Jim Butcher

If you’ve never read The Dresden Files you’re really missing something special.

  1. Cowards Glenn Beck

 

Not the best political book I’ve read, but not the worst.

  1. Dreadful Tales Richard Laymon

If there is one author I wish was still alive it would be Richard Laymon. He didn’t live long enough and didn’t write enough. You’ll get a thrill with anything he’s written.  These short tales of horror are no different.

  1. The Great Gatspy F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

I was surprised how much I liked this book. Not only was the writing perfect and flowing like a jazz song, but the lessons to be learned from the characters can benefit a lot of people today, including the cast of Jersey Shore.

  1. Guide to The Presidents Steven Hayward

This past year I wanted to learn more about each president. So I did.

  1. Odd Apocalypse Dean Koontz

 

A great addition to the Odd series by Koontz.  Though I’m sure not intentional, when it comes to this series the odd ones in the series are better than the even numbered ones.

  1. Perks of Being a Wallflower Stephen Chbosky

I was surprised by this book too.  I try to read the book if I know I’m going to see the movie, and the book surprised me with poignant charm and wit.

  1. Power vs. Force David Hawkins

 

Interesting, though it almost seems like someone was trying to sell me a bridge with this one.

  1. Real Marriage Mark Driscoll

A great primer for a young couple just starting out or an older couple wanting to continue their journey in a Godly marriage.

  1. Room Emma Donoghue

 

The viewpoint of this book is the most interesting thing. Told from the perspective of a five year old boy everything that is threatening takes on an innocent quality, even when dealing with suffering in the book.

  1. Rose Madder Stephen King

Not the greatest King book, though the story kept you hooked the ending was horrible, making the rest of the book a muddled mess.

  1. Skulduggery Pleasant Derek Landy

 

A teen series about a girl who finds out her Uncle consorted with a detective who is also a skeleton.  I don’t think I will finish this one.

  1. Snow Country Yasunari Kawabata

A beautiful book of early 20th century Japan.  If nothing else read this book for the stunning visualizations and descriptions

  1. Stories for Nighttime and some for Day Ben Loory

 

Odd, but entertaining.

  1. Swan Song Robert McCammon

One of the best post-apocalyptic books I’ve read in a long time.

  1. The Burglar in the Closet Lawrence Block

 

The second in the aforementioned series. Rodenbarr continues his shenanigans and gets into more trouble just trying to be an innocent burglar.

  1. The Gunslinger Stephen King

This was a reread, but I’m still counting it because this is my list and I’m the boss. The first book to the greatest series of all time.

  1. The Light Between the Oceans M. L. Stedman

 

One of the best books on choices and redemption I’ve read.

  1. The Midnight Lair Richard Laymon

A fun spelunking adventure with caves and tourists…and cannibals.

  1. The Prisoner of Heaven Carlos Zafon

 

A sequel to Angels Game which is a sequel to Shadow of the Wind. Though all of these books can be read stand alone. Should have stuck with Shadow of the Wind, it doesn’t need sequels.

  1. The Shining Stephen King

Great book and such an entertaining read. After reading this book I can no longer stand the movie.  (Though is it now Okay to admit that no one actually likes Stanley Kubrick?)

  1. The Stepford Wives Ira Levin

 

Ira Levin is an author who gets to the point. All of his books are short and to the point. They are also thrilling.

  1. The Twelve Justin Cronin

The second in Cronins’ The Passage series, the book was entertaining enough, but as with most trilogies you need a second book to get to the third.

  1. The Weird Sisters Eleanor Brown

 

I would have enjoyed this book more if I were a girl and had a sister. The reason I wanted to read it was the Shakespeare angle. If you’re a woman or have a sister you’ll really enjoy this book.

  1. The Wind Through the Keyhole Stephen King

It’s in The Dark Tower series, how is this not a good book?

  1. Untitled Julie Kaewert

 

A fun mystery about books and murder.

  1. The Brief and Wonderful Life of Oscar Wao Junot Diaz

An amazing book. Not only will you admire the characters, but you’ll learn a lot of history in the process.

  1. Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War H. W. Crocker

 

A good primer for those who want to  know more about the battles and commanders.

“I was reading the dictionary, I thought it was a poem about everything”

~ Steven Wright

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